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1897 Commercial Cable Company

 

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Stock Code VM-CCC1897

  Interim certificate for $10,000 bond, number 320. This is a 4% gold bond, issued to La Caisse  d'Economie de Notre-Dame de Quebec, secured by mortgage on the companies properties and issued to shareholders in exchange for their shares. Actual handwritten signatures of the Vice President and Albert Bock, Secretary.

Certificate size is 20.5 cm high x 30.5 cm wide (8" x 12").

A perfect personalised gift for someone who:

  • works or worked in the communications industry or
  • has the surname Bock

Company History

Framed Certificate Price : 660.00

Certificate Only Price : 610.00

 

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Company History

The Commercial Cable Company was formed in 1883 by John Mackay, a mining magnate, and Gordon Bennett, owner of the New York Herald, to compete with the Western Union Atlantic service. Six Atlantic cables were laid for the company, the first in 1884 and the last in 1923.

The first two Atlantic cables were manufactured and laid by Siemens Brothers using CS Faraday (1). Cable routes and lengths were as follows:- Dover Bay, Nova Scotia to New York 826 nm. Dover Bay - Waterville, Ireland 2399 nm and a second cable over the same route 2281 nm. From Waterville one cable, 330 nm long, ran to Weston super Mare, England, and the other, 514 nm in length, ran from Waterville to Le Havre, France. Once these cables were in operation they took a great deal of business away from Anglo American and Western Union.

It was not until 1894 that a third Atlantic cable of 2161 nm was laid; again Siemens Brothers manufactured the cable and used CS Faraday (1) to lay it, the route being the same as that used for the 1884 cables.

In 1900 Siemens Brothers, using CS Faraday (1), laid the first part of a fourth Atlantic cable for the company, this time however the route was Nova Scotia - Horta, Azores. A total of 1698 nm of cable was used in this expedition. The second leg of the cable from Horta to Waterville was laid in 1901 and once again the same manufacturer and cable ship was used. The length of the cable was 1204 nm. An additional cable was laid between Nova Scotia and New York by CS Silvertown, owned by the India Rubber, Gutta Percha and Telegraph Works Company, who also manufactured the cable. The Waterville - Weston super Mare cable was manufactured and laid by the Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company using CS Anglia.

The Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company undertook the manufacture of the fifth cable in 1905 using CS Anglia to lay the Waterville - Weston super Mare cable and the main cable across the Atlantic with CS Colonia and CS Cambria assisted by CS Mackay Bennett laying the Nova Scotia - New York cable.

The sixth and final cable was split between the two manufacturers, Siemens Brothers manufactured and laid the New York - Canso, Nova Scotia cable using CS Faraday (2). The Telegraph Construction and Maintenance Company undertook the manufacture and laying of the rest. This cable went via Horta on to Waterville and then to Le Havre. CS Colonia laid the main cable and a chartered vessel T. W. Stuart was used to lay the shore ends at Horta, Waterville and Le Havre.

When the Anglo American telegraph concession in Newfoundland ran out in 1906 CS Mackay Bennett diverted the two 1884 cables into St. Johns and a cable was laid direct from St. Johns to New York along with an extra link between Waterville and Weston super Mare.

Around the same time operational changes were made and from then on all telegraph circuits were leased by ITT World Communications Inc., although the Commercial Cable Company name was still in use on stationery and offices. The remaining cable ship CS John W Mackay, was transferred to the Commercial Cable (Marine) Company Ltd., finally being scrapped in 1994.

In 1928 the Commercial Cable Company merged with Mackay Radio & Telegraph and All America Cables, to form the American Cable & Radio Corporation, the major shareholder in this company being the International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation.

At the end of 1961 five of the above cables were still in operation; one of the original 1884 cables was no longer in use. The company applied to the Federal Communication Commission for permission to abandon all five cables. This was granted, leaving the company free of the burden of cable maintenance. By this time the American Cable & Radio Corporation already leased one circuit in both TAT 1 and TAT 2 and so had a greater capacity, as each telephone circuit was capable of carrying twenty two telegraph circuits.

Around the same time operational changes were made and from then on all telegraph circuits were leased by ITT World Communications Inc., although the Commercial Cable Company name was still in use on stationery and offices. The remaining cable ship, CS John W Mackay, was transferred to the Commercial Cable (Marine) Company Ltd., finally being scrapped in 1994.

Source: www.atlantic-cable.com

 

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